No Cosigner International Student Loans are Now Available at Select Schools
July 12th, 2016 by Bryanna Davis

money in bank-515705750We’re excited to announce that a no cosigner international student loan is now available to international students! International Student Loan has partnered with MPower Financing to offer the no cosigner loan to students attending a few select colleges and universities in the US. To qualify, you must be enrolled at one of the select schools in a graduate program, or within two years of graduation from an undergraduate program. Instead of evaluating the credit history of a cosigner, the no cosigner approval process will review your academic success and career potential. Although international students may not have any US based financial history, many have worked hard to create tremendous opportunity for themselves, and are a good risk for a loan. The no cosigner loan was created with these students in mind.

Conventional international student loans require a US cosigner, so the loan company has someone to look to for repayment of the loan if you default. Even domestic US students applying for a private student loan almost always need a cosigner, as students generally lack credit history. Many students either cannot find a cosigner, or would prefer not to involve a family member or friend in their financial life if at all possible. With the no cosigner loan, you are solely responsible for repayment of the loan plus all interest, and your interest rate will be fixed somewhere between 7.99% and 13.99%, competitive with conventional co-signer loans though a bit higher.

Applying for the no cosigner loan takes less than 10 minutes and upon approval the funds are released directly to your university. These funds can then be used towards educational expenses like tuition, housing, meal plans and health insurance. Students from 180 countries (including the US) are eligible to apply.

The no cosigner loan will not be a solution for everyone, as most US colleges and universities are not yet eligible. The fastest way to check eligibility for any international student loan, including the no cosigner loan, is to complete the loan comparison on the homepage of International Student Loan. In just a few seconds, you’ll see the options available to you as an international student at your school.

If your school is not eligible for the no cosigner loan, and you want more information about whether the program is a good fit for your college or university, please send us a note.


Study Abroad Loans Can Help You See The World
July 6th, 2016 by Lette Berhe

see the worldFor most American students taking out a loan to pay for college is a given, but many students do not consider the possibility of using the money to help them study abroad to enrich their college experience. If a study abroad program has not been on your radar, it may be time to reconsider. In today’s globalized world, studying abroad is becoming an important investment.

What many students are unaware of is that many study abroad programs are sponsored by their university. What this means is that if you choose to study abroad for a semester or for the entire year, that time abroad is considered part of your ¨normal¨ college tuition. This is great because you will be able to use all of your financial aid during your time abroad. What normally happens, however, is that study abroad expenses add up quickly with the cost of tuition, books, transportation, travel fees, and living expenses. Due to this, all of your financial aid may not be enough, especially taking into consideration that you probably will not be working or have a stable income while you are abroad. If your financial aid is not enough then a study abroad loan can help. Below are 3 reasons why you should take out a study abroad loan and travel overseas! Read the rest of this entry »


What You´ll Need to Make Your Loan Application a Breeze
June 21st, 2016 by Lette Berhe

education moneySummer is now in full swing and most of you probably have already made your final decision on what university you will be attending for the 2016-2017 academic year. For those of you who haven’t officially accepted enrollment, be sure to do that as soon as possible! Although you have now finished with all your college applications, the next step is starting your loan application. Do not fret! It may sound daunting, but here´s a break down of what information you’ll need to make your loan application a breeze.

  1. How Much Money You Want to Take Out
    Before you can even dive in to begin figuring out which loan is the right fit for you, you´ll need to know how much you are going to take out. Although it does require some planning and number crunching, having this amount ready to go before you start looking at different lenders will make your decision process a lot easier and could save you money. Now you may be asking yourself, ¨how much should I borrow?¨ The key is to try and borrow the amount that you will realistically need and not an excessive amount. When receiving your student loan it may seem like it´s free money, but you must remember that it is not! If you borrow more money than you need your monthly payments will be higher, any financial aid you were given may be reduced, and you may be in debt longer than you would like. When calculating how much to take out as a loan, take into consideration the following: your university´s cost of attendance, funds in the case of an emergency, unexpected expenses, possible income, and how much money you have saved up.
  2. Your Personal Information
    Now a days most lenders have made filling out your loan applications simpler, by allowing you to fill it out and submit it online. However, to speed up the process it is best to sit in front of your computer with all the information you’ll need right off the bat. This will prevent you from having to pause filling out the application to go in search of missing information. Below is a list of what personal information you should have prepared.

      • University name, address, and telephone number
      • Your major, year (freshman, sophomore, etc.), school term
      • Your current home address and telephone numbers
      • Housing information: rent or own, monthly payment amount
      • Gross income
      • Personal References: name, occupation, relationship, contact information
  3. A Cosigner
    Having a cosigner on a student loan application is usually reserved for and required for non-US citizens, however US citizens or permanent residents can also benefit from adding a cosigner to their application. A cosigner is a person who joins your loan application and legally agrees to take responsibility for your loan payments in the event that you are unable to pay them. For international students, who are non-US citizens planning to attend a US university, having a co-signer is required. However, US citizens or permanent residents can choose to add a cosigner in order to increase their chances of loan approval and to receive better interest rates.Because your cosigner must be a US citizen or permanent resident (green card holder) you will need to have their personal information on hand such as name, address, telephone number, and social security number. It is important to inform your cosigner that they may have to log in themselves to fill out and sign a part of the loan application.

Read the rest of this entry »


Apply Now for International Student Loans!
June 1st, 2016 by Jennifer Frankel

student loanUniversities throughout the United States welcome ten of thousands of international students to their campuses every year. Going to school in the United States can be an extremely rewarding experience, but paying for it can be a challenge. Most students rely on several funding sources, such as scholarships, grants, family, personal savings, and finally, student loans. Many American students rely on government loans, but these are not available for international students. Fortunately, there are many international student loans available from private lenders.

By using our comparison tool, you can immediately see what lenders are available depending upon what school you plan to attend. You can then apply immediately online. Follow these steps to get the process started. Follow these easy steps to apply online now:

  1. Find a cosigner.
  2. Enter your information into our comparison tool.
  3. Compare lenders.
  4. Apply online.
  5. Wait for pre-qualification.
  6. Complete your application.

Read the rest of this entry »


Loan Grace Period: Grace Has Left The Building
May 19th, 2016 by Lette Berhe

calendarFor recent college graduates, between the celebrations, the job hunt, and just simply enjoying summer, you may have put thoughts of your student loans on the back burner. You may have remembered that your loan qualified for a grace period , but can´t remember exactly how long it was and don´t know how to enter into the world of loan repayments. Here are some tips to get you started on the right foot!

Double-check Your Calendar
Although, you haven´t been stressed about repaying your loans, the minimum grace period allotted tends to be about 6 months so your repayment season is more than likely approaching. Remember that lenders consider you a responsible adult who now has a debt to pay. This means you should not wait for them to contact you! If you´ve pushed your loans out of your mind for a while, now is the time to do all your research. To find out how long your grace period really is you can do the following:

  • Read your loan promissory note:
    Don´t remember what that is? Your loan promissory note is the contract you signed at the very beginning promising that you would repay your loan. It holds detailed information about your loan amount, the grace period, and the repayment plan you originally chose.
  • Contact your lender: Can´t seem to find your promissory note or feeling a little overwhelmed looking over the paperwork?  Whatever the case remember that your lender is only a phone call away. Don´t hesitate to take the time to contact your lender directly to discuss the details.

Research Your Options
Your promissory note may be a signed contract, but this does not mean that everything is set in stone. In general, lenders want to be paid back. What does this mean? It means that they are usually willing to work with you from the beginning to ensure that you will make on-time payments. The grace period you are given is meant to give you time to find work and establish yourself after graduating. However, things don´t always work out just the way we planned. If your financial situation isn´t where you would like it to be you have some options:

  • Extend your grace period or request deferment: Not all lenders or loans provide this option, but it is worth looking into. If you are unemployed or going through financial hardship, it is possible that your lender will give you a little extra time. Depending on your lender, this can be considered an extension on your current grace period or fall under the category of deferment, a postponement of your loan payments. Being aware of what option they offer you is important, because you may only be eligible to request it once.
  • Review your repayment plan:
    As previously mentioned, all the details of your loan are spelled out on your promissory note. If financially you aren’t where you would like to be, but you think you can still begin to make payments, another option is to try and switch repayment plans. Lenders are aware that your originally chosen repayment plan may not fit your current situation and will be able to help you choose a better option.

By following these two steps you will be fully informed and ready to jump into the world of loan repayment. Take the time to do your research and don´t be afraid to ask questions. It is better to go into loan repayment fully prepared so that you never have to miss a payment!

For more information regarding your student loans, be sure to check out our International Student Loan Advice section.


4 Benefits of Student Loans When You’re an International Student
September 9th, 2015 by Anum Yoon

piggy bankStudent loans are an integral part of college, especially in a country like the U.S. where tuition rates are sky high. However, international students are at a disadvantage when it comes to obtaining loans to help pay tuition. Federal loans are off the table and can only be acquired by citizens. However, more and more private loans are becoming available to international students. This is great news, as are some important benefits from obtaining student loans. Here are the benefits of student loans when you’re an international student:

  1. They Fill the Gap That Scholarships Cannot

If you’re studying internationally, hopefully you’ve scoured all available options for scholarships. Many universities will have opportunities for you, while some are known for being extremely generous to their international students. Getting your education fully funded is still unlikely unless you’re one of the absolute top students in your class.

Student loans aren’t merit based, so anyone attending an eligible school can potentially receive what they need to pay for school regardless of their grades. However, if you’re looking to go to school in the U.S., you’ll need a co-signer who’s either a permanent resident or a citizen. Your home country might also have some financial aid for international students; do a search for those.

Regardless, having to pay back loans is a lot less fun than receiving the money outright in a scholarship. Don’t fret – this brings us to the next benefit of student loans. Read the rest of this entry »


A US Bank Account: Make Your Life Easier
August 24th, 2015 by Lette Berhe

financial safteyOnce you have arrived to the US and begin settling into your new college environment, you may start to notice that most people do not carry around much cash. Almost everywhere, including parking meters, allow for the option of paying with a debit or credit card. For those international students who plan on staying a year or more, opening up a US bank account will make almost every aspect of your financial life a little bit easier.

Why Open Up an Account?

In the US, the norm has shifted from carrying a wallet full of bills to a wallet full of cards. However, having a bank account won’t just be convenient when it comes to your personal spending, but can be useful in paying for bills and cashing checks.

  • Rent & Utilities: Although most students live on campus their first year, many tend to move  off campus for their second. Off-campus housing means that you´ll be renting an apartment from a private owner that may have no affiliation with your university. Many off-campus residencies provide online portals for their tenants to be able to pay rent via the internet. Many gas and electric companies also utilize an online payment system. By having a bank account you’ll be able to make all of these payments quickly and easily.
  • Cashing Loan Checks: Whether you will be receiving extra money from financial aid or you will have leftover money from your student loan, you will most likely receive it in the form of a check. With an account open, it will make the process of cashing these checks easier and give you a safe and secure location to keep it stored away.
  • Getting Paid: For those of you who are planning to make some extra cash by working on campus, you will learn to love direct deposit. In the US most people receive two paychecks a month. With a bank account open you will be eligible to receive direct deposit, which means that rather than receiving your check then having to go into a bank to cash it, your money will go straight to your account on payday.

Read the rest of this entry »


3 Key Things to Look for When Comparing Loans
July 14th, 2015 by Lette Berhe

man on $The world of loans may seem intimidating at first glance, but by educating yourself it becomes a  lot easier to manage. By using our Loan Comparison Tool your loan search will be narrowed down to provide you with lenders that work with your citizenship status and your school. Although, we make the process of finding a loan simpler, when it comes to comparing loans what is it that you should look at? Below are 3 key things to look for when comparing loans.

1. Low APR
APR  stands for annual percentage rate; although, represented as a percentage it should not be confused with your loan’s interest rate. The APR is usually higher than the fixed or variable interest amount that the loan offers you, because in addition to the interest rate it takes into account additional fees (origination, disbursement, application), length of the deferment period, and how interest capitalizes. Often times lenders will provide you with an attractive interest rate, but not mention what fees may be found in the fine print. The usage of the APR system was required by the government to protect individuals from bad loan practices from banks. Your loan is a long term investment, so using the APR is a better way to quantify the real costs of loans and a lower percentage means the less you´ll be paying in the long run. Read the rest of this entry »


3 Key Loan Tips for Foreign Enrolled Students
March 11th, 2015 by Lette Berhe

475702399If you are a US student planning to directly enroll in a foreign university, one of the most important things to stay on top of are the deadlines. Having a solid timeline outlined for applications (university, financial aid, loans) will help ensure that you take advantage of all financial assistance at your disposal. If you have made the decision to take out a private student loan, make sure that you have exhausted all your other options: scholarships and savings (and FAFSA if you are a US student). The college application process can be overwhelming, but here are some key loan tips to help ease the stress.

1. Ask and You Shall Receive
Knowledge is power; the more informed you are the easier your decisions will be. Foreign universities may have a different system than what you are familiar with, so it is a good idea to get in contact with the financial aid department. Opening a line of communication with the school´s financial aid advisors can help you create a solid financial plan. You can normally find the financial advisors’ contact information published on the school website. Here are some ideas of what may be worth asking: Read the rest of this entry »


COA: How it Can Save You Money
February 25th, 2015 by Lette Berhe

87465943A crucial part of the education loan process is determining how much money you are going to borrow. Some students begin to run wild with the idea of receiving a loan check, but it is important to be conscious that a loan is not free money – you will have to pay it back. This being said, the less you borrow the better. There are many ways to minimize the amount that you will need to take out as a loan, but the first thing you should find out is your university´s cost of attendance (COA). Read the rest of this entry »